Compare and contrast theories on grief and loss

Tweet Because of the commonality and universality of grief, it is one of the most studied areas in the field of psychology today. Even though grief is a normal — even healthy —response to loss, it is also terribly painful and confusing. Grief brings out a wide range of expected emotions, including sadness, anger, numbness, isolation - and eventually acceptance.

Compare and contrast theories on grief and loss

Some time between 9 and 14 Octoberwhen Coleridge says he had completed the tragedy, he left Stowey for Lynton. On his return, he became sick and rested at Ash Farm, located at Culbone Church and one of the few places to seek shelter on his route.

In the summer of the yearthe Author, then in ill health, had retired to a lonely farm house between Porlock and Linton, on the Exmoor confines of Somerset and Devonshire.

On awakening he appeared to himself to have a distinct recollection of the whole, and taking his pen, ink, and paper, instantly and eagerly wrote down the lines that are here preserved.

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At this moment he was unfortunately called out by a person on business from Porlockand detained by him above an hour, and on his return to his room, found, to his no small surprise and mortification, that though he still retained some vague and dim recollection of the general purport of the vision, yet, with the exception of some eight or ten scattered lines and images, all the rest had passed away like the images on the surface of a stream into which a stone had been cast, but, alas!

Then all the charm Is broken—all that phantom-world so fair Vanishes, and a thousand circlets spread, And each mis-shape the other. Stay awhile, Poor youth! Yet from the still surviving recollections in his mind, the Author has frequently purposed to finish for himself what had been originally, as it were, given to him.

As a contrast to this vision, I have annexed a fragment of a very different character, describing with equal fidelity the dream of pain and disease. It was northeast of Cambaluor modern-day Beijing. The book contained a brief description of Xanaduthe summer capital of the Mongol ruler Kublai Khan. The text about Xanadu in Purchas, His Pilgrimes, which Coleridge admitted he did not remember exactly, was: In Xandu did Cublai Can build a stately Pallace, encompassing sixteen miles of plaine ground with a wall, wherein are fertile Meddowes, pleasant Springs, delightfull streames, and all sorts of beasts of chase and game, and in the middest thereof a sumptuous house of pleasure, which may be moved from place to place.

In about —, he dictated a description of Xanadu which includes these lines: And when you have ridden three days from the city last mentioned Cambaluor modern Beijingbetween north-east and north, you come to a city called Chandu, which was built by the Khan now reigning.

There is at this place a very fine marble Palace, the rooms of which are all gilt and painted with figures of men and beasts and birds, and with a variety of trees and flowers, all executed with such exquisite art that you regard them with delight and astonishment.

Round this Palace a wall is built, inclosing a compass of 16 miles, and inside the Park there are fountains and rivers and brooks, and beautiful meadows, with all kinds of wild animals excluding such as are of ferocious naturewhich the Emperor has procured and placed there to supply food for his gerfalcons and hawks, which he keeps there in mew.

He described it this way: Moreover at a spot in the Park where there is a charming wood he has another Palace built of cane, of which I must give you a description.

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It is gilt all over, and most elaborately finished inside. It is stayed on gilt and lackered columns, on each of which is a dragon all gilt, the tail of which is attached to the column whilst the head supports the architrave, and the claws likewise are stretched out right and left to support the architrave.

The roof, like the rest, is formed of canes, covered with a varnish so strong and excellent that no amount of rain will rot them.

Compare and contrast theories on grief and loss

These canes are a good 3 palms in girth, and from 10 to 15 paces in length. They are cut across at each knot, and then the pieces are split so as to form from each two hollow tiles, and with these the house is roofed; only every such tile of cane has to be nailed down to prevent the wind from lifting it.Grief and bereavement are different for each individual, that is no two people will experience a loss in the same way.

An Opposing Point of View

A loss is the absence of something we deem meaningful. Over the years there have been many different theories of grief, but it is not a ‘one size fits all’ approach. This raises a curious observation: it should really only be kosher to round off >1 digit at a time.

If you only know something to the accuracy of , you can’t round to 45, only to 40, because the is already “rounded” within your understanding of its accuracy — it could be a , and therefore the rounding to 45 isn’t appropriate.

Dec 09,  · The four-component model relies heavily on emotion theory. It proposes that understanding grief is based on the context of the loss (e.g., was the death expected?), continuation of subjective meaning associated with the loss (e.g., questioning the meaning of life), changing representations of the lost relationship over time, and the role of coping and emotion-regulating .

Grief Varies with Culture Cross-cultural study looks outward, seeking an opening to the varieties of cultural expression around the world; but it also looks inward, because an understanding of others can enrich our understanding of our own culture.

The experience of such a loss, especially within a group of people as dependent of one another as is the family, is often the cause of grief for the bereaved individuals.

The perception of death, nevertheless, seems to differ from culture to culture, as do the rituals encompassing the coping of . Sep 11,  · Even though grief is a normal – even healthy –response to loss, it is also terribly painful and confusing.

Grief brings out a wide range of expected emotions, including sadness, anger, numbness, isolation - and eventually acceptance.

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