An analysis of the importance of constructivism

Many in disability studies approach disability as a culturally constructed experience, owing its existence to the beliefs and practices built around how any given society responds to human difference.

An analysis of the importance of constructivism

As with any school of thought, there are internal rivalries within constructivism; some scholars make use of organization theory and some draw from discourse analysis.

This begs the question: And is it sufficient? This essay will argue that, due to the inherent nature of a social approach to international politics, constructivism is indeed predominantly focused on the shared understandings of actors but that, although the relationship between the social and the material could be further explored, this approach still supplies an adequate explanation of the role of material forces in the world.

An analysis of the importance of constructivism

The second section will analyse how constructivism accounts for the material within international politics and whether this is indeed an insufficient explanation. The final section will summarise and conclude the key points that have been argued in this essay.

Too Focused on Norms?

[5] Constructivism, here, will refer to the modernist version and not the stricter forms of this approach. Constructivism called for a careful technical analysis of modern materials, and it was hoped that this investigation would eventually yield ideas that could be put to use in mass production, serving the ends of a modern, Communist society. Approaches based on constructivism stress the importance of mechanisms for mutual planning, diagnosis of learner needs and interests, cooperative learning climate, sequential activities for achieving the objectives, formulation of learning objectives based on the diagnosed needs and interests. An Analysis of the Failure of Constructivist.

First of all, it is important to note that constructivism underlines the significance of both material and discursive power in international politics.

Agents are seen as knowledgeable and reflexive; their actions inform the structure which in turn informs the action of the agents. We are constantly creating normative structures and inventing new ones as we act; constructivism applies this logic to state action within international politics and this is imperative to understanding why constructivism places the majority of its focus upon norms.

Therefore, the constructivist focus upon norms is of greater use in accounting for change and cooperation in international politics in comparison with an inherently materialist theory such as Neorealism which cannot truly account for change or cooperation in international politics.

Even further, norms such as human rights, non-intervention, humanitarian intervention and the right to protect have evolved over a substantial period of time. For instance in An analysis of the importance of constructivism, Britain, France and the US intervened after the Libyan people themselves requested assistance; not only this, but the fact that it was a multilateral effort demonstrates how states now work cooperatively instead of individually in order to gain legitimacy; the normative structures informed their action.

Thus, constructivism is predominantly focused on the duality of structure and agency through which norms, interests and ideas are both the medium and the outcome, but is it too focused on norms and ideas? A holistic approach to international politics which aims to better our understanding of change in the world, such as constructivism, will clearly have a strong focus on norms on the whole as shared ideas and rules inform the actions of states within international politics.

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As I analyse in the next section, constructivism does not lose sight of material forces in international politics and, this, combined with its dominant focus on norms is important if one wishes to understand and explain change and cooperation in the world.

As the above section demonstrated, constructivism opposes materialism and places structures of sociality over structures of materiality. Whereas, the fact that the United States holds a nuclear arsenal does not perturb the Israelis because the US has come to be perceived as a friend over time whilst Iran is classed as an enemy; as Wendt states: Is this an inadequate account of material forces?

What would constitute an adequate account?

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An inadequate account of material forces would surely be one which expounded the notion that material forces are insignificant in the world or one that took the material for granted.

It acknowledges the existence of the material and accounts for material forces in terms of their incorporation within the normative structures which inform state behaviour.

It is in this respect that constructivism accepts that material forces hold weight in international politics; yes, they are dependent on the ideational but constructivists do not propose that material forces are meaningless in international politics; they recognise that material forces are a part of the international system but only through the ideational do they gain a purpose.

Indeed, the relationship between the ideational and the material could be, and should be, further explored within the field of constructivism but, as it stands, the present constructivist account of material forces acquiring meaning via shared knowledge is sufficient in explaining their role in international politics.

The Case For A Better Account of Material Force There is a growing determination within the constructivist literature to explore the relationship between the social and the material, which demonstrates that there is indeed more exploration to be conducted in order to create a better balance between the ideational and the material within constructivist analysis.

However, an approach that is able to provide a thorough analysis of how the material world impacts international politics, whilst adhering to the limitation or enablement of normative structures, would only benefit constructivism since this area has been seriously underrepresented in the literature.

In all likelihood, this is the greatest advance within constructivism that we can hope for. It is therefore intelligible to concur with Martin and Hollis that such a synthesis between the two is impossible.

Although constructivism does place its emphasis on the effect that ideas, norms and interpretations have on international politics, its account of material forces, albeit imperfect, is definitely adequate. It explains how these forces gain meaning within international politics and therefore helps us to better understand their role and why they are utilised in certain ways.

An analysis of the importance of constructivism

Though a greater explanation of material forces within constructivism is much sought-after, this is a path for future International Relations scholars to explore. The current constructivist account of the material is sufficient in combination with the predominant focus on the ideational. The reasons put across to support this argument are numerous.

An approach which places the social world as its primary importance will inherently focus most of its attention on norms; we see this through the vehicle of the agency-structure dynamic and the evolution of norms as shown through the example of Libya.

It not only acknowledges the existence of material forces but it also grants them with meaning and value through the structure of shared knowledge in which they contribute; we see this through the examples of the balance of power and nuclear relations.

To summarise, constructivism rightly places social practices, and their ability to inform the behaviour of actors within international politics, at the core of its approach; the material account it presents is one which suitably explains how these forces acquire value in international politics through shared knowledge, even though there is certainly room for further exploration in the relationship between the ideational and the material.Constructivism called for a careful technical analysis of modern materials, and it was hoped that this investigation would eventually yield ideas that could be put to use in mass production, serving the ends of a modern, Communist society.

The Impact of Constructivism on Education: Language, Discourse, and Meaning M. Gail Jones Laura Brader-Araje Constructivism's perspectives on the role of the individual, on the importance of meaning-making, and on. Approaches based on constructivism stress the importance of mechanisms for mutual planning, diagnosis of learner needs and interests, cooperative learning climate, sequential activities for achieving the objectives, formulation of learning objectives based on the diagnosed needs and interests.

An Analysis of the Failure of Constructivist.

Constructivism: Too Focused On Norms? | heartoftexashop.com

Policy Analysis: The Field Of Social Work - Policy Analysis is a complicated topic in the field of social work. It is used as a means to study and understand a policy in all of its dimensions. International Relations, Principal Theories Anne-Marie Slaughter Scholars have subjected this claim to extensive statistical analysis and found, with perhaps the exception of a few borderline cases, it to hold (Brown Lynn- 19 Constructivism is not a theory, but rather an ontology: A set of assumptions about the.

Constructivism's perspectives on the role of the individual, on the importance of meaning-making, and on the active role of the learner are the very elements that make the theory appealing to educators.

Constructivism (philosophy of education) - Wikipedia